Tuesday, 10 June 2014

NEW - IT IS NOT A MATTER OF 'IF' - BUT 'WHEN" THE YELLOWSTONE SUPER VOLCANO WILL ERUPT (AS IT HAS MANY TIMES BEFORE)...HERE IS HOW IT WILL EFFECT US ALL

Yellowstone Super Volcano projected ash fall, don't think this is your ordinary brush fire ash, volcanic ash is powdered stone - if you inhale it - it mixes with the fluid in your lungs and becomes like concrete...and you DIE. 2/3 of the USA will become an instant death zone in the first few days.
So you think a Yellowstone Super volcano is going to be an 'American' problem - not yours? Think again! 
The Global effects of a Yellowstone Super Volcano eruption will not be globally felt until 4 weeks AFTER the eruption. Billions of tonnes of Sulfur Dioxide will wrap their way around the northern Hemisphere, cutting down the sunlight...within weeks the temperature will plummet - as much as 20 degrees in some places.
Then the same will occur in the southern Hemisphere, the Monsoon in Asia and the Rainy Season in the Neotropics will fail, bringing drought and famine to the most densely populated regions of the Earth. 
Things will get better IN A FEW YEARS - for those who can survive that long. 
 
Volcanologists from the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey have predicted that the next major Yellowstone eruption would make Mt. St. Helens look like a mere geologic hiccup. The 1980 St. Helen's eruption sent 1.25 cubic miles of ash into the air; in comparison the next Yellowstone "event" could potentially produce approximately 500 times that output volume (or 625 cubic miles). Crop failures resulting from the cataclysmic event could last for years as a consequence of that much particulate and sulfur dioxide content in the air.

Hazards

Graphic representing the frequency of hazardous events that may occur at Yellowstone.
 (Click image to view full size.)
Graphic representing the frequency of hazardous events that occur at Yellowstone.
The Yellowstone Plateau in the northern Rocky Mountains in Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho is centered on a youthful, active volcanic system with subterranean magma (molten rock), boiling, pressurized waters, and a variety of active faults with significant earthquake hazard. Within the next few decades, large and moderateearthquakes and hydrothermal explosions are certain to occur. Volcanic eruptions are less likely, but are ultimately inevitable in this active volcanic region.
Over the past 2.1 million years Yellowstone volcano has had three immense explosive volcanic eruptions that blanketed parts of the North American continent with ash and debris. Each of these eruptions created sizable calderas: basins formed by collapse of the ground after evacuation of subsurface magma reservoirs. The Yellowstone Caldera, which comprises nearly one-third of the land area in the park, formed 0.64 million years ago and was followed by dozens of less explosive but large lava flows, the last of which erupted 70,000 years ago. Basin and Range extension of the western U.S. has created a series of regional faults that are responsible for large and devastating earthquakes in the Yellowstone region along the Teton and Hebgen Lake Faults; most recently a devastating Ms 7.5 earthquake in 1959 killed 28 people. Yellowstone’s famous geothermal waters create fabulous hot springs and geysers but occasionally explode catastrophically to create hydrothermal explosion craters found throughout the park.


YELLOWSTONE VOLCANO OBSERVATORY MONTHLY UPDATE
Monday, June 2, 2014 12:48 PM MDT (Monday, June 2, 2014 18:48 UTC)


YELLOWSTONE VOLCANO (VNUM #325010) 
44°25'48" N 110°40'12" W, Summit Elevation 9203 ft (2805 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN

Seismicity
During May 2014, the University of Utah Seismograph Stations, responsible for the operation of the Yellowstone Seismic Network, reports 135 earthquakes were located in the Yellowstone National Park region. The largest event was a small earthquake of magnitude 3.5 on May 31, at 4:25 PM MDT, located about 13 miles southwest of Mammoth, Yellowstone National Park. Notable May earthquake sequences are described below.

1) A small series of 11 earthquakes (magnitudes 0.4 - 1.9) on May 5th and 6th, located about 4 miles north northeast of West Thumb, YNP.

2) A small series of 14 earthquakes (magnitudes 0.1 - 2.1) on May 8th and 9th, located about 16 miles southwest of West Thumb, YNP.

3) On May 29 a series of 26 eathquakes (magnitudes 0.5 - 2.1) were located about 9 miles north northeast of Old Faithful, YNP.

4) A north-south trending series of earthquakes, over seven miles in length, which began in September, 2013 picked up again from May 10 to 31 with 42 events. The largest earthquake was magnitude 3.5 on May 31, at 4:25 PM MDT, located about 13 miles southwest of Mammoth, Yellowstone National Park.

Earthquake sequences like these are common and account for roughly 50% of the total seismicity in the Yellowstone region. 

Earthquake activity at Yellowstone is currently at background levels.


Ground deformation
Subsidence in north-central Yellowstone continues, although the deformation rate has slowed. Since May 1, 2014, NRWY has moved about 8 mm down and slightly (< 3 mm) to the west. Northward motion appears to have ceased. Measurements from temporary GPS instruments, deployed in March 2014 near Beryl Spring and Grizzly Lake, show a similar pattern of deformation.

Uplift within the Yellowstone Caldera, which began in 2014 after 4 years of subsidence, continues. Since the beginning of 2014, the caldera has risen about 2 cm.

The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO) provides long-term monitoring of volcanic and earthquake activity in the Yellowstone National Park region. Yellowstone is the site of the largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features in the world and the first National Park. YVO is one of the five USGS Volcano Observatories that monitor volcanoes within the United States for science and public safety.

YVO Member agencies: USGS, Yellowstone National Park, University of Utah, University of Wyoming, UNAVCO, Inc., Wyoming State Geological Survey, Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, Idaho Geological Survey

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Jacob Lowenstern, Scientist-in-Charge
jlwnstrn@usgs.gov


AN EXCELLENT LOOK INTO OUR GLOBAL FUTURE WHEN IT BLOWS
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Noti_VHOrLk

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